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What to Do If Your Car Has Been Towed

What to Do If Your Car Has Been Towed: 10 Important Things to Know

You’ve parked your car and, as usual, you’ve double-checked that you’ve locked it. Nothing can go wrong. And then after some time, you come back from a happy night out with friends to find that your car has been towed away by the local council for being parked in an unapproved street parking space. What do you do now? This is a feeling that almost every driver has faced at some point or another, and it can be extremely stressful and disorienting. However, there are some things to bear in mind if this ever happens to you again — here are 10 useful things to know if your car has been towed.

Check to see if your car is actually towed

The first thing you should do is check to see if your car has been towed at all. This may sound silly, but it’s important to know that you’ve been wrongly towed before you do anything else. There are two main ways to do this: Firstly, you can ask the parking attendant to check their records to see if your car is listed there — they may not do this if they’re extremely busy, though. Alternatively, you can check your car yourself. If you can’t see your car, then it’s likely that it has been towed away. If you’re sure that your car has been towed, then next you need to find out where it’s been taken. You can find this out by calling the local towing company and asking them where your car has been taken. Alternatively, you can ask any parking attendants in the vicinity for the name of the towing company that towed your car.

 

It’ll cost you money to get your car back

The first thing to know about getting your car back once it’s been towed is that you’ll have to pay a fee to do so. Depending on where you live, the fee you’ll need to pay to get your car back may be very low, or it may be very high indeed. There are no nationwide standard costs to retrieve towed vehicles, so you’ll have to check your local regulations or ask the parking attendant where your car has been taken. If you don’t have enough money to pay the towing fee, then you may be able to apply for a low-cost or free retrieval by providing proof of your poverty — examples of acceptable documentation may include a copy of your last few pay stubs or a signed letter from an approved state or federal financial assistance program. Check with your local towing company to see if this is an option for you.

You can find out where your car has been taken

If your car has been towed and you’re not sure where it’s been taken, then you can find out where the towing company has taken your vehicle by contacting the towing company directly. You can find the name and contact details of your local towing company from your city’s Department of Transportation office. Alternatively, you can ask any parking attendants in the vicinity for the name of the towing company that removed your car or you can just simply Google it. Once you’ve contacted the towing company and requested that they tell you where your car has been taken, they’ll have to inform you of the name of the storage garage where your car has been held. If you have any problems getting this information, then you can call the Department of Transportation and they’ll sort out the issue for you.

You can request a hearing to dispute the tow

If your car has been towed for a specific reason, such as because it was parked in a disabled parking spot without displaying a disabled parking permit, or because it was blocking a fire hydrant, then you can request a hearing to dispute the tow. This is something that you have the right to do in most states and cities, and it’s usually done by filling out a form at the Department of Transportation office. If you dispute that your car was towed, you’ll have to prove your case at a hearing. You’ll also have to pay a fee to dispute the tow, which varies by jurisdiction, although it’s often less than the full towing fee. If you win the hearing, then you’ll get your money back, but you may also have to pay a fee to the Department of Transportation.

Parking violations can make getting your car back more difficult

If your car has been towed for a parking violation, then you may have to go to court to get your car back — this is especially true if you parked illegally in a disabled parking spot, or if you parked in a tow-only zone. If you have to go to court, then you’ll have to pay a fine before you’re allowed to retrieve the car, and you may also have to pay towing and storage fees. The fines and fees you’ll have to pay will vary by city, so you’ll want to check this before you go to court. If you’re using a towing company, then you may be able to negotiate a lower fee, or even get your car back for free. This all depends on the company and the circumstances surrounding your car’s removal — if you’re in any way unclear about the process, then you should call the Department of Transportation and ask for help.

If you’re still confused, ask for help from a parking attendant or the police

If you’ve followed all of the steps above and you’re still confused about how you can get your car back, then you should ask for help from a parking attendant, a police officer, or any other official in the vicinity. They’ll be able to tell you the correct course of action, and they’ll be able to assist you in making sure that you don’t miss out on your car. You may also want to consider hiring a lawyer to help you with the situation. Lawyers are trained in this type of thing, and they can help you through the process a lot more quickly and easily than you’ll be able to do on your own. If you’re unsure where to find a lawyer, you can try asking your family and friends for recommendations.

Conclusion

Getting your car towed is never a pleasant experience, but it doesn’t have to be impossible either. Follow the steps above to make sure that you get your car back as quickly as possible, without having to go through any unnecessary stress or confusion along the way.

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